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Home > About the Chesapeake > Exploring the Bay > Chesapeake Bay Workboats > Deadrise Dugout Bateau Log Canoe Brogan Buyeye Pungy Skipjack Deadrise Draketail Tonger / Dredge
Deadrise
Bay Workboats
Key Features:Any of several variations of the Chesapeake Bay workboat, all having a V hull and a hard chine between the side and bottom. Variations on stern shapes are associated with particular places around the Chesapeake Bay, although the most common is a full transom stern or “box stern.” Most boats have a small cabin forward and an open cockpit aft. Today, deadrise bateaux usually are powered with a single gasoline engine and propeller, although twin screw and diesel engines are increasingly popular among watermen. Since the mid-1990s most deadrises have been built of fiberglass.
Period of Use:c. 1910 - present
Use:Oyster tonging, crabbing, clamming, eeling, and net fishing; also charter fishing
Interesting Facts:Deadrises are common on the Chesapeake and are called by many names including bateau, deadrise (which loosely refers to the V-bottom), or simply “workboat.”
Where to see one:Deadrise workboats can be found all over the Bay region, with either commercial watermen working the waters of the Bay or used by commercial fishing charters.

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