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Home > About the Chesapeake > Bay Regions
Bay Regions
Not all Chesapeake places are alike. The Bay and its watershed are too big for that, and the area's human stories are too diverse. Each of the regions of the Bay has a distinct natural and cultural identity, reflecting the different ways powerful Bay influences show up in different places and among different peoples.
The Susquehanna River and Northern Bay Region The Susquehanna River and Northern Bay
The storied Susquehanna is the biggest single source of fresh water to the Chesapeake Bay. It’s also a vital natural link connecting the scenic shores of the upper Bay with lands and people hundreds of miles away.
The Eastern Shore Region The Eastern Shore
When people think of classic Chesapeake landscapes, they’re usually thinking about the Eastern Shore. Here are the meandering rivers and lush wetlands, the roadside farm stands and moving maritime scenes.
The Mouth of the Bay, Hampton Roads and the James River The Mouth of the Bay, Hampton Roads and the James River
Near the famed Jamestown settlement, Chesapeake traditions continue to thrive in modern-day urban environments. Once fishing fleets head out of the snug harbors here, they pass alongside monumental Navy and cargo ships in Norfolk harbor.
Northern Neck, Middle Peninsula and the York River Region Northern Neck, Middle Peninsula and the York River
As timeless as they are scenic, the two Virginia peninsulas perched north of the York River are filled with winding rivers, gentle hills, and rural landscapes. The Chesapeake’s maritime traditions run as strong here today as they do anywhere on the Bay.
Northern Neck, Middle Peninsula and the York River Region The Potomac River
At the mouth of the Potomac is Point Lookout, one of the most spectacular of Chesapeake vistas. That marks the end of the river’s 400-mile journey, which starts in the West Virginia mountains and passes the capital city of Washington, D.C.
Maryland's Western Shore Region Maryland's Western Shore
The Bay’s “other” shore offers its own generous share of natural attractions and cultural gems. Big-city Baltimore and maritime Annapolis are its best-known destinations. But plenty of rural farmland, forested parks, and scenic rivers await as well.

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